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Relationship changes

It is important to let the APSS know when your circumstances change, especially if you are changing your name, address, or your beneficiaries.

If you get married or begin a de facto relationship

If you have changed your name, address or other details, you can simply notify us by calling SuperPhone on 1300 360 373.

Consider whether you wish to nominate (or change) the beneficiaries for your APSS benefit in the event of your death. Read more about beneficiaries.

If you have a child

Consider whether you wish to nominate (or change) the beneficiaries for your APSS benefit in the event of your death.

If you separate or get divorced

If you are getting divorced or separated, you should review and update any beneficiaries you have nominated for your APSS benefit in the event of your death.

If you have changed your name, address or other details, you can notify us by calling SuperPhone on 1300 360 373.

How you choose or change your beneficiaries

Non-binding (or preferred) nomination: Login to your account or call SuperPhone and make your changes over the phone. You can also download the nominate your preferred beneficiaries form or call to have one sent to you.

Binding nomination: Download the Binding beneficiary nomination form or call to have one sent to you.

Reversionary nomination: This is for APSS Pension accounts only. A reversionary beneficiary is selected when you open an APSS Pension Account. There are limited circumstances in which you can change your reversionary beneficiary. For more information contact SuperPhone on 1300 360 373.

If you are a Spouse member, you do not have to give up your membership in the APSS when you divorce or separate. You can continue your membership by transferring your Spouse Account balance into an APSS Rollover Account, or (if eligible), by taking your benefit in the form of an APSS Pension even after your separation or divorce is finalised. However, when a marriage or relationship breaks down, you may need to think about whether you want to split your super.

Under family law legislation, super benefits can be split as part of a property settlement between eligible married or de facto couples. These laws also mean that your spouse can request information about your super and that a flag may be placed on your account, which doesn’t allow us to pay any benefits to you while the flag is in place. You can learn more about superannuation and splitting on the Australian Family Law Courts website.